Family Fun Day – July 29, 2017

Saturday, July 29, 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

at the Hi-Desert Nature Museum

and the Yucca Valley Community Center

 

 

Brown Bag Lunch Lecture – July 20, 2017

“Important Birds of Ancient Lake Cahuilla and the Salton Sea”

Before the Salton Sea, there was Ancient Lake Cahuilla.   Only hundreds of years ago this giant freshwater lake filled the entire Salton Sink and most of the Coachella Valley.  Birds and people depended on this body of water just like they do today.  In this program you’ll learn about the special birds associated with this lake that was six times bigger than today’s Salton Sea.

 

Kurt Leuschner is a Professor of Natural Resources at College of the Desert where he teaches courses on Conservation, Entomology, Field Ornithology, Native Plants, and GPS Navigation.  He has a Bachelor’s degree in Zoology from U.C. Santa Barbara and a Master’s in Wildlife Ecology from the University of Florida.  He is the founder of the Desert Cities Bird Club, on the Board of Directors of Western Field Ornithologists, and is past President of the Natural Science Collaborative.  His most recent publications are the Palms to Pines Birding and Nature Trail map and brochure and a Field Guide to Desert Golf Course Wildlife.  Kurt also teaches weekend courses and workshops on birdwatching, insects, GPS, and backyard habitats for UCR Extension, the Desert Institute, the Desert Studies Center, and the Living Desert. His latest research project involves the sound recording of the various subspecies of Western Scrub-Jay.

Bring your lunch, bring your friends, or just bring yourself to our Brown Bag Lunch Lecture Series once a month.  Speakers will present topics of special interest for high desert residents. The lectures start at 12:00 p.m. Admission is $ 5 – Free for Members/Sponsors – beverages will be served.

Brown Bag Lunch Lecture – June 15, 2017

Living with Desert Wildlife: How to Help Native Species

with Emma Baldwin,Primary Wildlife Rehab Keeper at The Living Desert

Wildlife rehabilitation is the treatment and care of injured, orphaned, or sick wild animals so that they can be released back to the wild. 

Everybody has found a baby bird that could not quite fly or the little bunny that for sure shouldn’t be out on its own, the lizard that has lost its tail, or the tortoise that was just too small. In this lecture, Emma Baldwin, Primary Wildlife Rehab Keeper at The Living Desert, will talk about some of the problems wildlife is facing and what everyone of us can do to prevent some of the more common wildlife issues. She will also introduce the do’s and don’ts of assisting a wild animal in need.

Emma Baldwin is the Primary Wildlife Rehab Keeper at The Living Desert for their Native Wildlife Conservation Program. She has worked at The Living Desert for 4 years.  She has a bachelor’s degree in biology also works as a zookeeper in the North American section of The Living Desert.

Bring your lunch, bring your friends, or just bring yourself to our Brown Bag Lunch Lecture Series once a month.  Speakers will present topics of special interest for high desert residents. The lectures start at 12:00 p.m. Admission is $ 5 – Free for Members/Sponsors – beverages will be served

For more information on animal rehabilitation check  The Living Desert website.

 

Chamber Music at the Museum- June 3 and 4, 2017

CHAMBER MUSIC AT THE MUSEUM

The Hi-Desert Nature Museum announces its 2nd Chamber Music at the Museum fundraiser.  Join us at the Museum for a delightful musical experience, as the   Encelia Chamber Ensemble and junior ensemble, the Encelia Minors share the stage to perform works by master composers such as Handel, Bach, Mendelssohn, Sonderho, and more.  The performance will then be followed by a meet and greet reception.

 

Tickets are available online for a donation of $20 for standard seating and $25 for preferred seating.

Purchase your tickets early online,

at the Hi-Desert Nature Museum Thur.-Sat., 10 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.,

or the Yucca Valley Community Center Mon.-Thur., 12 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. 

Having trouble signing up online?  Click here:  How to sign up online

 

 

 

 

2017 RRR Exhibit

The 2017 Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Exhibition

The Hi-Desert Nature Museum’s much anticipated annual art exhibition showcases artwork made from recycled and reused materials in an effort to raise awareness about our “throw-away” society and its impact on the environment.  This is a community-curated exhibition, where adults, young adults, and children alike have the opportunity to express their creativity and environmental stewardship.

The Hi-Desert Nature Museum is located in the Yucca Valley Community Center Complex.  If you have any questions about this exhibition or event, please call 760.369.7212.

 

Brown Bag Lunch Lecture – May 18, 2017

The benefits and costs of cooperation in societies:

perspectives from a social insect specialist.

presented by Dr. Jessica Purcell, UCR

Social insects have successfully spread into most environments on earth, and exhibit a tremendous variety of lifestyles and social structures.  It is fascinating what diversity of strategies have evolved in these tiny societies, that allow these insects to exploit resources and compete successfully from Arctic to tropical latitudes. In this talk, Dr. Purcell will focus on two components of her research.  First, the geographic patterns in the distribution of alternative social forms in spiders and ants, and what these patterns reveal about the environmental factors that shape insect societies.  Second, how insect societies cooperate to overcome major environmental hurdles.  Specifically, she will explain research on the formation of complex structures, such as ant rafts, that improve group survival during emergencies.  She will also describe new research directions that are focusing on the social life and ecology of our local desert ants.

 

Dr. Purcell was thrilled to learn that she could put her curiosity about the natural world to good use during her undergraduate studies in biology at Williams College in rural Massachusetts.  Upon the advice of her mentors, she spent the first couple of years after graduation living abroad and conducting research on declining Andean woodlands and migratory Arctic geese in Bolivia and Sweden, respectively.  She then returned to graduate school at the University of British Columbia, with the goal of understanding why a small number of spider species form highly cooperative social groups.  Dr. Purcell’s fascination with tiny societies continued with a postdoc on ant sociality at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland, and she now runs a lab at UC Riverside studying the causes and consequences of cooperation in social insects including native and invasive ants and wasps, and, occasionally, social spiders.

 

Bring your lunch, bring your friends, or just bring yourself to our Brown Bag Lunch Lecture Series once a month.  Speakers will present topics of special interest for high desert residents. The lectures start at 12:00 p.m. Admission is $ 5 – Free for Members/Sponsors – beverages will be served.

Agave Harvest

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Brown Bag Lunch Lecture – March 16, 2017

Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument –

What the rocks tell us about ecosystem response to past climate change

with Kathleen Springer, Geologist – U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Image result for Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument

Paleowetland deposits comprise the entirety of Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument and entomb the spectacular namesake Pleistocene faunal assemblage.  Study of these deposits in detail, reveals that the very springs that were the magnet and water source for animals in an otherwise arid environment, were highly sensitive to past abrupt climate change. This presentation will show that entire ecosystems collapsed repeatedly in response to prolonged drought. How did the animals respond?  How will modern desert wetlands respond to current warming climes’?

Kathleen Springer Biography

I study geologic deposits associated with desert wetlands, pluvial lakes, and anything else I can get my hands on to query the paleoclimate record of the American Southwest. I was trained as a geologist and paleontologist, with B.S. and M.S. degrees in Geological Sciences from the University of California, Riverside, and spent the first part of my career at the San Bernardino County Museum where I was the Senior Curator of Geological Sciences. Now with the USGS, my research focuses on deciphering paleo-depositional environments of Quaternary localities (paleowetlands and pluvial lakes) throughout the Mojave Desert and southern Great Basin, stressing the application of detailed stratigraphic and chronologic controls. I also use detailed geologic mapping to understand how hydrologic systems in the desert responded to past episodes of climate change and tectonic activity. In addition, I am a lifelong geoscience educator and communicator, specializing in earthquake science messaging by raising awareness of earthquake hazards and risk and promoting natural disaster preparedness, work which continues today.

Bring your lunch, bring your friends, or just bring yourself to our Brown Bag Lunch Lecture Series once a month.  Speakers will present topics of special interest for high desert residents. The lectures start at 12:00 p.m. Admission is $ 5 – Free for Members/Sponsors – beverages will be served.

Seeds: Nature’s Artful Engineering – January 7 – March 11, 2017

 

On display January 7 – March 11, 2017

This exhibit aims to increase awareness and appreciation of the beauty, diversity, ingenuity and critical importance

of seeds and their dispersal mechanisms in California native plants.

Against many, many odds they are the final step in ensuring the survival of plant life.

Workshop – Identifying Native Plants – April 5, 2017

Workshop – Identifying Native Plants

April 5, 2017        2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

 

Always wanted to learn the names of all those wildflowers growing in the yard and alongside the road?  This workshop will not only help you get to the right names, it will also give you a new    appreciation for how many different species of plants are in our area. Bring in some of your favorite weeds for sharing. Tools and materials are provided.  Join Mark Wheeler at the Museum for this hands-on introduction to native wildflower identification.

Price: $20 (free for museum members), call the Museum to reserve your space or e-mail.