Brown Bag Lunch Lecture – November 17, 2016

The status of the Joshua Tree at Joshua Tree National Park

with Neil Frakes, Division of Resource Management at Joshua Tree National Park

Bring your lunch, bring your friends, or just bring yourself to our Brown Bag Lunch Lecture Series once a month.  Speakers will present topics of special interest for high desert residents. The lectures start at 12:00 p.m. Admission is $ 5 – Free for Members/Sponsors – beverages will be served.

There is growing concern among the scientific community that Joshua trees are vulnerable to climate change. Predictive modelling efforts have shown that Joshua trees could be extirpated from Joshua Tree National Park within 80 years or reduced to approximately 10 percent of their current range and restricted to areas known as refugia. A lack of seedling establishment has also been found at the harshest, driest sites at lower elevations. Recently a petition has been put forward to consider listing the Joshua tree under the Endangered Species Act. Joshua trees are the namesake of the park and are a major attraction to visitors. Popular media has latched on to these findings, and visitors often wonder if Joshua trees are disappearing from the park. Vegetation staff at the park are beginning to establish a network of long-term monitoring plots to document changes to Joshua tree populations. We are sampling the same sites that were sampled in the 1970s as part of a Master’s thesis, allowing us to assess change over a 40 year period. Park staff are also focusing on sampling the lowest elevation areas where Joshua trees first start occurring, as these are likely most vulnerable to the effects of climate change and where signs of decline might already be noticeable. Joshua trees can also be impacted by wildfire, and the park is looking at ways to protect potential climate change refugia for Joshua trees from burning, as much of the area identified as refugia has already burned. Despite the growing concern for Joshua trees, there are a few signs of hope, that highlight the resilience of this long-lived desert species.

Photo: Research Associate measures the height of a Joshua tree, south of the North Entrance, Joshua Tree National Park.

Neil Frakes is the Vegetation Branch Chief in the Division of Resource Management at Joshua Tree National Park. He oversees a variety of vegetation based programs at the park including native plant restoration, invasive plant species management, field botany, climate change monitoring, and rock climbing stewardship. He started at Joshua Tree in July of 2015. He holds a B.A. in Geography and Environmental Studies from Macalester College , and an M.A. in Geography from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Prior to working for the National Park Service, he worked for the U.S. Forest Service in the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program. He grew up in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

Halloween Spooktakular – October 29, 2016

Join us for a day of Halloween-themed games and activities at the Yucca Valley Community Center and the Hi-Desert Nature Museum.

Dress in costume or come as you are and enjoy our frightfully fun activities.

Contest rules for Carved Pumpkin and Costume Contest: Halloween Contest Rules2016

 

Chamber Music at the Museum – October 8 & October 9, 2016

Chamber Music at the Museum

Featuring the

Encelia Chamber Ensemble & Friends

Saturday, October 8 at 7:00 p.m. and Sunday, October 9 at 2:00 p.m. (Matinee)

 

The “Encelias” will be joined by David & Paulette Miller a Flute & Harp Duo. David and Paulette have been performing together for many years in Southern California and Italy. davidandpaulette.com

 

Tickets will be available online September 7th for a donation of $15 for standard seating and $20 for preferred seating.

Purchase your tickets early online or at the Hi-Desert Nature Museum during opening hours.

All proceeds will benefit the Hi-Desert Nature Museum.

 

 

Seat reservations can be made in person at the

Hi-Desert Nature Museum

Thursday through Saturday,10 a.m. to 5 p.m. or

at the Yucca Valley Community Center

Monday through Thursday, 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Both are located in the Yucca Valley Community Center Complex

at 57090 Twentynine Palms Hwy., Yucca Valley, CA 92284.

You can also make your reservations online:

http://www.maxsolutionsonline.com/yuccavalley/Customer/BrowseActivities.aspx

Need help signing up online?  Click here: How to sign up online

download flyer

 


Archaeology Symposium Launch – September 30, 2016

September 30, 2016 at 7:00 p.m.

The Archaeology of Joshua Tree National Park—Past, Present, and Future

Michael Newland, Sonoma State University

Joshua Tree National Park has some of the most fascinating archaeology found  anywhere in the United States. The park was home to several Native American cultures,  including the Cahuilla, the Serrano, the Chemehuevi, and the Mojave, who lived here over centuries and continue to view many areas of the park as sacred.  Many archaeologists have made remarkable finds that have changed science’s understanding of California prehistory and the metamorphosis of this rugged landscape over the past 10,000 years. This talk will highlight some of the discoveries, including the presenter’s own research, as well as discuss some of the challenges the Park and tribal advocates face in preserving this remarkable heritage for future generations.

 

 

JTNP Archaeology Symposium

Approaching 100 years of Archaeology in Joshua Tree National Park:

A Centennial Celebration

This symposium examines the many contributions that have led to our understanding of the prehistory of the park and the greater Mojave Desert.  This symposium will feature professional archaeologists, cultural resource managers,  and academic researchers as they reflect on the past 100 years of archaeology in the park and highlight future directions of archaeological inquiry.

Saturday, October 1, 2016 from 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. at Black Rock  Nature Center. This event is free and open to the public.  Refreshments will be provided.

 

For more information call (760) 367-5522 or check https://www.nps.gov/jotr/planyourvisit/calendar.htm

For more events click here

 

 

Brown Bag Lunch Lecture -September 15, 2016

Species by Feces

Presented by Stefanie Ritter M.S.

Explore the fascinating world of scat and other animal excretions.  Even a walk in your own backyard can become an exciting wildlife adventure that takes you through all the levels of the food chain.  Lose the repulsion about poop and start to appreciate its storytelling qualities.

Stefanie Ritter is the Museum Programs Supervisor and resident biologist with a wealth of information on the topic of natural science.

 

 

 

Bring your lunch, bring your friends, or just bring yourself to our Brown Bag Lunch Lecture Series once a month.  Speakers will present topics of special interest for high desert residents. The lectures start at 12:00 p.m. Admission is $ 5 – Free for Members – beverages will be served.

Download flyer here

MBHS presents 2nd Wednesday September 14, 2016

Stories of Willie Boy: A Lasting Desert Legacy

with Ruth Nolan, author historian

The Morongo Basin Historical Society’s 2nd Wednesday Lecture Series is held at the Hi-Desert Nature Museum, 57116 29 Palms Hwy, Yucca Valley.

Lecture begins at 5:30. Donation is $5.00.

Brown Bag Lunch Lecture -August 18, 2016

Drawn on Stone

with Tamara Serrao-Leiva

Ancient art was left by people tens of thousands of years ago and is still largely debated among scholars and researchers.  Take a tour through Europe, Africa, and North America, to investigate the different types of rock art, how it was made, and what it could mean. Can we use modern “rock art” to give us an answer? Audience participation is highly encouraged!

Tamara Serrao-Leiva is the Curator of Anthropology at the San Bernardino County museum. Having worked as an archaeologist in cultural resources management, she developed a fascination for the symbols she would see every day in the field. She completed her Bachelor’s Degree from the University of California, Santa Barbara and continued as a graduate student at the University of Sevilla, Spain where she received a Master’s Degree in prehistoric archaeology. She now serves on the board of various non-profits in Redlands and continues to work diligently on the Anthropology and Ethnography Collections at the museum.

Bring your lunch, bring your friends, or just bring yourself to our Brown Bag Lunch Lecture Series once a month.  Speakers will present topics of special interest for high desert residents. The lectures start at 12:00 p.m. Admission is  $ 5 – Free for Members -  beverages will be served.

Brown Bag Lunch Lecture – July 21, 2016

The Rocks Speak: Understanding Indigenous Science and Technology


This lively one hour interactive presentation is an introduction to indigenous philosophy presented by Culture Bearer and Author, A.G. Vasquez, MA. The program offers an unconventional take on the relationship between native peoples and modern scientific practices, the background behind the use of plants, stones and ritual objects in healing and the use of real world empirical observation by indigenous cultures.

A.G. Vasquez is the founder of Casa de Culturas in Joshua Tree, creator of the Living on the Dime project     and author of ‘Mexican Americans In Redlands’. Currently, Vasquez is engaged in a multiple city indigenous cultural heritage tour, Kokopelli Spirit Journey. He holds degrees in U.S. and Latin American History and resides in Joshua Tree.

Bring your lunch, bring your friends, or just bring yourself to our Brown Bag Lunch Lecture Series once a month.  Speakers will present topics of special interest for high desert residents.

The lectures start at 12:00 p.m. Admission is $ 5 – Free for Members – beverages will be served.

For more info on Antonio Vasquez and the Kokopeli Spirit Journey visit: Casa de Culturas

Brown Bag Lunch Lecture – June 16, 2016

Venomous Animals of the Joshua Tree National Park and the Mojave Desert

Presented by Jeffery Burkhart, PhD

Jeffery Burkhart, PhD, is Fletcher Jones Professor of Biology at the University of La Verne where he is just approaching retirement following 44 years of university teaching.  Though his PhD was completed on the ecology of a desert grasshopper, he has long had an interest in reptiles and amphibians, and has researched and taught a number of related courses for The Desert Institute of Joshua Tree National Park
In this lecture he will touch on the nature of animal venoms and toxins, and on specific Mojave Desert arthropod, amphibian and reptile species that are noxious, toxic, or important as disease vectors.

Bring your lunch, bring your friends, or just bring yourself to our Brown Bag Lunch Lecture Series once a month.  Speakers will present topics of special interest for high desert residents. The lectures start at 12:00 p.m. Admission is $ 5 – Free for Members – beverages will be served.

Hi-Desert Star article

 

 

 

Youth Summer Camp 2016

Our summer camp is offered to children 6 to 12 years of age. It is themed around the Museum’s “Framed—Step into Art” exhibit. Programs run Tuesday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon. The cost is $20 per week. Sign-up in person at the Yucca Valley Community Center or online at www.hidesertnaturemuseum.org. Pre-registration is required.

Sign -up online

How to sign up online

Download summer camp flyer pdf