Brown Bag Lunch Lecture – February 15, 2018

Living on the Edge, San Bernardino Kangaroo Rats and Fire, Floods, and Development

with Geary Hund, U.S. Fish and Wildlife

The endangered San Bernardino kangaroo rat, like its namesake hops on its hind legs and it has two pouches (for storing seeds). It lives in a unique and dynamic environment, the habitat which forms in river bottoms between floods. This survival strategy ensures that its habitat will be refreshed from time to time by flooding and may reduce competition from other animals, but it also means that it lives in constant risk of being flooded out of house and home.  Now, in addition to floods the San Bernardino kangaroo rat is at risk from human activities such as the construction of flood control structures, in-stream mining and the development of housing tracts. Find out how this resilient, adaptable, animal, and the plants and animals it coexists with, are managing in an ever changing environment and what its prospects are for the future.

Geary is a graduate of Humboldt State University with Bachelor of Science Wildlife Biology and Natural Resources.  He was a career employee with California State Parks, working first as a park ranger and then an ecologist.  After retiring from State, he worked as a refuge biologist at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge.  He subsequently served as the California public lands director for The Wilderness Society and the Associate Director of the Coachella Valley Mountains Conservancy.  He’s currently working as a Senior Scientist for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service doing endangered species work.

Bring your lunch, bring your friends, or just bring yourself to our Brown Bag Lunch Lecture Series once a month.  Speakers will present topics of special interest for high desert residents. The lectures start at 12:00 p.m. Admission is $ 5  or free for Museum Members/Sponsors.  Beverages will be served.